MERRY CHRISTMAS FROM MURCIA!

Hi everybody! It’s Carmen Marina again, and I want to wish you a merry Christmas. Hope the Turkish and French students enjoyed in Spain! I loved the experience of being with all of you.

So.. I’m going to talk about some Christmas customs from Murcia.

1. ‘El Belén’

One of the main traditions is the Bethlehem, a miniature representation of the Holy Family on the birth of Christ together with the shepherds, Reyes Magos, etc.. Put in homes and can be a true work of art.
Traditionally, this Bethlehem with children and come together over the house to sing carols, Christmas songs accompanied by tambourines and bagpipes.

2.  Eve dinner and ‘Misa de Gallo’

The tradition of Nochebuena (Christmas Eve night) is quite familiar. In fact, until recently, the bars and restaurants did not open that night. It makes a familiar character dinner, the menu today is very varied, the most common being the seafood or poultry (turkey, capon, etc.), But until recently, each region had a typical dinner.
The desserts usually consist of nougat and marzipan, desserts both of Arabic origin made ​​with almonds and honey, which once took in the coffee shops in town but now, most are industrial production.

The ‘Misa de Gallo’ consists in the Christian celebration of the birth of Baby Jesus. His two readings and the gospel narrative focus on the birth in Bethlehem.

At 24:00 practicing Catholics go to the ‘Misa de Gallo’  Currently, young people, after dinner and family gatherings, come to celebrate the Christmas party with friends.

            

3. The Christmas Day meal

The Christmas Day meal was a big party of the year, the family gathered in the broadest sense (grandparents, uncles, cousins​​, etc. ..) and put the best clothes in the house, the best dishes, etc. .. .

What was the typical ‘Caldo con pelotas and the ‘Tronco de Navidad’ (a kind of Swiss roll cake covered with chocolate).

4. The Carols and ‘The Day of the Innocents

Children roam the streets in gangs singing carols from house to house and asking for the “aguinaldo” (sweet, some coins, etc). This tradition has lost much in big cities, but it is still preserved in the villages.

On the 28th of December is the day of the innocent, the day is allowed to play tricks on people. As we see, Christmas is a time full of fun for the kids.

            

5. New Year’s Eve

The tradition of New Year’s Eve is the most widespread of the Twelve Grapes.

It consists of eating a grape each chime of the clock giving the Puerta del Sol in Madrid, at 12 pm on December 31, before, of course, accompanied with a nice dinner at the family meeting. It is said that those who do not eat 12 grapes before the end of the stroke will have a year of bad luck.

In some years now, it has become too fashionable to wear red underwear: panties, underwear, a garter, etc..

This event was broadcast live on television. The Spanish, in their homes, waiting for the moment the first bell to eat twelve grapes, 36 seconds before midnight. You eat a grape every three seconds, one for each chime. Previously, before the bell, a metal ball down the clock and sound four quarters.

After this ritual, the young come out to celebrate New Year.

                     

6. ‘Los Reyes  Magos’

The day dedicated to children’s ‘Noche de Reyes’. On 5th January we witness the arrival of the Magi, who come in and parade through the streets of towns and cities throwing candy. Then to bed early that night because the Magi, if we’ve done well, we will bring everything I’ve asked.
If we have not done well, we will leave coal.
Much of this tradition, has been moved to Christmas Eve, where Santa Claus arrives, so that children take advantage of school holidays to play with gifts, but the illusion is still in ‘Los Reyes Magos’.

THAT’S ALL, HOPE YOU ENJOYED! (;

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One Response

  1. You can be sure you told very good 🙂 I am sorry because we will not be able to see christmas in real. I wish we could see your celebrations 🙂 Hasan/Adıyaman

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